Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Looking At The History Of Domestic Violence Social Work Essay

emotional stateing at At The History Of internal Violence Social Work quiz The Experience of Domestic Abuse Amongst South Asian Women How issues of interior(prenominal) financial aid attention maltreatment arise in Asian families is it prevalent amongst Asian communities much than occidental European communities, or is this a myth created by media what be rudimentary cultural issues (ie. Forced marriages, honour killings/ military force, in submitectual abuse, physical abuse, rape, etc) how does the community/family reply to domestic abuse when it is perpetuated, how atomic number 18 the women treated, is their support from within the community for these womenDomestic fury kitty breach up an enormous effect on your cordial wellness. It is now well accepted that abuse (both in childhood and in adult life) is often the main factor in the development of depression, foreboding and otherwise genial health disorders, and may lead to sleep disturbances, self-ha rm, suicide and attempted suicide, eating disorders and substance misuse. (See References.)Abused women ar at to the lowest degree three times more likely to experience depression or anxiety disorders than other women.One-third of all in all female suicide attempts and half(a) of those by Black and ethnic minority women faeces be attributed to prehistorical or current experiences of domestic military group.Women who use kind health advantage atomic number 18 much more likely to create experience domestic hysteria than women in the general population.70% of women psychiatric in-patients and 80% of those in secure settings digest histories of physical or sexual abuse.Children who live with domestic violence atomic number 18 at increased risk of behavioural problems and wound up trauma, and mental health difficulties in adult life. (See also Children and domestic violence.)An scrutinise in Greenwich found that 60% of mental health assist users had experienced domesti c violence. Another survey of women using mental health go in Leeds found that half of them had experienced domestic violence and a further quarter had suffered sexual abuse.How your mental health can be used to abuse you furtherIf you accommodate a mental health diagnosis, your partner may soak up used this to abuse you even more. For example, bySaying you couldnt cope without him.Saying youre mad.Not allowing you to go anywhere only because he is your carer.Speaking for you You know you get confused/youre not in truth confident/you dont get wind the issues. state you youre a bad mother and cannot look subsequently the children properly.Forcing you to have an abortion because you couldnt cope.Threatening to counter the children away.Threatening to tell Social Services the implication be they will propose the children away.Telling the children Mummy cant look later on you.Deliberately misleading or confusing you.Withholding your medication.Withholding or coercing you into using alcoholic beverage or drugs.Undermining you when you disclose the abuse or take on for sponsor You cant think her shes mad.These tactics will al virtually certainly add to your emotional tribulation and exacerbate any existing mental health issues.If you have been diagnosed with a mental health disorder, you will be in a oddly vulner open position, and are likely to acknowledge it even harder to report domestic violence than other women. You are likely to suffer from a witness of shame because of the stigma attached in our society to having mental indisposition of any kind, and you may regain even more powerless. Furthermore, the response of the overhaul come throughrs is also likely to be more problematic, due to the stigma of being mentally illThey may not believe you when you disclose abuse.They may see you only when your partner is present.They may accept your partners account at face value.They may feel sympathy for your partner After all he has had to pre scribe up with or blame you for the abuse.They may think you (particularly if you are self-harming or have attempted suicide, or if you use alcohol or drugs).Dont blame yourself Your mental health difficulties are not your fault, and you are not responsible for the abuse the abuser is. You are entitled to serve well as much as any other abused woman, and if you have additional support inescapably, you should get help with them too.Some refuge organisations are unable to go game fitting to women with severe mental health guides because they have insufficient resources to provide suitable support. However, other refuges will be able to accommodate you and all refuge organisations should be able to find oneself you mostwhere else to go. If you have decided to leave your abuser, you could ring the Free bring forward 24 time of day field Domestic Violence Helpline on 0808 2000 247, run in confederacy between Womens Aid and Refuge, which will be able to put you in touch with a refuge organisation that can provide accommodation that meets your support needs.Mental health goDespite the frequent crossway between domestic violence and mental ill health, mental health professionals seem generally to ignore the issue of abuse. They are unlikely to ask you roughly it and may therefore be unaware of it. You yourself may feel unable to disclose the abuse to your GP or to your community psychiatric nurse (CPN) or your psychiatrist (if you have one). So you may find that the reasons for your depression or other difficulties are ignored. You may feel unredeemed for the abuse. And you are very likely simply to be catered medication (such as tranquillisers, anti-depressants or sleeping pills) instead of being go forn an opportunity to babble about what is feeling or has happened to you.When mental health professionals do take domestic violence into account, they may still disagree about the causes of your set apart and how to treat it. For example, most p sychologists believe that the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), most often associated with wars or natural disasters such as fire or earthquake, or experiences such as torture or being held hostage, can be appropriately applied to survivors of domestic violence. Other people ask that anxiety and depression, and even self-harm or suicide attempts may be the natural response to the experience of long-term abuse.While depression tends to ease when women are no longer being abused this will not happen immediately. It may take a long time for you to come to price with what has happened. You may suffer preserved abuse and harassment long after the relationship itself has ended and you are likely to live in devotion of it for much longer. You may also experience flashbacks long after the violence has ceased.See Surviving after abuse Looking after yourself and despicable on for some suggestions on how to deal with this. pleaderall(a) women who are experiencing or ha ve experienced domestic violence will need emotional support of some kind, but their needs will vary. All women need to be listened to with respect and without being judged when they choose to talk about their experiences. They motive to be believed and to feel they have been understood. Mutual support from other women who have had similarly abusive experiences can be very invaluable it will help you to feel less isolated and to recognise that none of the abuse you experienced was your fault. You will get this kind of support if you go into a refuge, or if you use a Womens Aid outreach service, or uniting a support group.Some women may benefit from more prescribed focal point or psychotherapy though not usually slice they are still living with their abuser or immediately after escaping from the violence, when physical safety and practical issues are likely to be of greater concern. If you decide you would like some steering, the following learning may help you.Counselling is a two-way relationship, in which the advocator listens to whatever you want to say, in confidence and without making judgements. Counsellors are not supposed to give advice, but they may ask questions or challenge you in slipway which may help you to look more carefully at some of the assumptions you may have taken for granted. Usually you will have stock sessions, for an hour or slightly less, each week or each two weeks. psychotherapeutics tends to be more intensive than counselling, and may continue for a longer period of time, as issues are explored in more depth. Some people, however, use these terms interchangeably.The aim of counselling is to help you understand yourself better and come to terms with what has happened to you. Good counselling will help you to break away from past abusive relationships and work towards living in a way which is more satisfactory and fulfilling for you. It can also help you to build up your self esteem. However, counselling is not for ev eryone and you have to decide whether it is right for you and whether this is the right time for it.If you decide you want some counselling, it is master(prenominal) that the counsellor or therapist you choose is right for you, and that she is appropriately fit and experienced. She should also have a good understanding of domestic violence and its effects, and should take care not to appear to blame you or crop you feel guilty in any way for the abuse you experienced. Styles of counselling differ a lot depending in part on the divinatory approach of the counsellor or therapist and you may find some approaches more helpful then others.In some parts of the country, there are counselling services specifically set up by women for women, and many of these have a particular focus on issues of violence and abuse. Some also offer support groups for survivors of domestic violence. Some of these are listed at the end of this section. If you hit your local anaesthetic Womens Aid organ isation, they may be able to put you in touch with a counselling service or support group in your area. Some counselling organisations offer sessions that are free of charge others charge a fee unfree on your income.Your GP surgery may have a counsellor to which your doctor could point you, or he or she might refer you to an NHS psychologist though there could be a long waiting list. NHS services will be free of charge, but may be time-limited. Alternatively, you could achieve an organisation such as the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) which can give you a list of trained and accredited counsellors in your area. These will charge an hourly fee, though some may have concessionary rates for those on low incomes. In each case, it is important that you feel happy with your counsellor, and are able to build up a sonority and a sense of trust in the relationship.Further informationFreephone 24 hour National Domestic Violence Helpline on 0808 2000 247, ru n in partnership between Womens Aid and Refuge They will be able to put you in touch with your local Womens Aid organisation or other domestic violence service.Saneline For anyone concerned about their own mental health or that of someone else. Local rate helpline 08457 678 000, open 1pm 11pm every day. Website www.sane.org.ukSamaritans Provides a listening service for those in distress or considering suicide. 24 hour helpline 0845 790 9090.Rethink (formerly the National Schizophrenia Fellowship) Rethink provides a capacious range of services throughout the UK, including supported housing, helplines, employment projects and support groups. To contact the Rethink National Advice Service, please call 020 8974 6814. The Service is available from Monday to Friday 10am 3pm, shut out Tuesday and Thursday 10am 1pm. Website www.rethink.orgMind Mind offers information and support on mental health issues, and where to get help. The national information line can put you in touch with loca l Mind groups, which may run local helpines, support groups and other activities. Mind also produces a wide sort of leaflets and other publications on mental health issues. Mindinfoline 08457 660 163, Monday Friday 915am 515pm (not entrust holidays). Typetalk for callers with hearing or speech problems who have access to minicom 0800 959 598. telecommunicate emailprotected Website www.mind.org.uk scepter The helpline, due to lack of funding, can only provide information and asignposting service to women, their carers and workers during 10am 1pm on Tuesdays. Womens Mental Health Infoline 0808 808 6000, Answerphone at other times. email emailprotected Website www.thresholdwomen.org.ukNo Panic Provides a free information relative majority, and their answerphone refers callers to other meter where they can talk to one of their volunteers for support. Also refers to local services when available. Freephone 0808 808 0545, 10am 10pm, for those suffering from anxiety disorders an d panic attacks.Depression Alliance Depression Alliance has a national network of self-help groups. It also offers a correspondence scheme. It does not offer a helpline scheme. phone 0845 123 2320 (local call rates) for a free information pack and to find out contact numbers for services locally. Email emailprotected Website www.depressionalliance.orgNational Self-harm Network For those who self-harm or for those supporting them. The network offers information (and debunks myths) about self-harm and lists organisations which provide support. Website www.nshn.co.ukBristol Crisis Service for Women This service is for women in emotional distress, particularly those who injure themselves. The service provides a range of booklets on topics such as self-help for self-injury. Although Bristol-based, it serves the whole of the UK, and can refer to local services if needed. Address PO Box 654, Bristol, BS99 1XH. Helpline 0117 9251119, Friday and Saturday 9pm -1230am sunlight 6pm 9pm.Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre (RASASC) Helpline will take calls from women nationwide, and refers to local services if appropriate. Also offers face-to-face counselling and group counselling for women in Croyden who have been raped or sexually abused. P.O.Box 383, Croydon, CR9 2AW. Helpline 0845 122 1331, weekdays 12 twelve noon 230pm and 700pm -930pm weekends and bank holidays 230pm 5pm. Minicom 020 8239 1124. Email emailprotected Website www.rasasc.org.ukYoung Minds Parents information service Provides help for parents concerned about a preadolescent persons mental health. Has a variety of leaflets and booklets, including one which explores how divorce and separation affect children and young people. call in 0800 018 2138, Monday Friday 10am 1pm Tuesday and Thursday 1pm 4pm Wednesday 1pm 4pm and 6pm 8pm. Website www.youngminds.org.ukCounselling services for womenBritish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy This is the professional body for general counselling services, and can give you names of qualified and BACP-accredited counsellors in your area. The website includes a note on decision the right therapist, as well as a directory of therapists throughout the UK. Phone 0870 443 5252. Email emailprotected Website www.bacp.co.ukWomankind Helpline Offers face-to-face counselling and support groups for women in the Bristol and South Gloucestershire areas. Phone 0845 458 2914, Monday Friday 10am 12 noon Tuesday and Wednesday 1pm 3pm Monday and Tuesday 8pm 10pm. Answerphone at other times. Website www.womankindbristol.org.ukThe Maya Centre for women living with violence Services are provided free for women on benefits or low incomes who have not had the opportunity to use other counselling services and have not had the benefit of degree-level education. Phone 020 7281 2728. Address Unit 11, City trades union Trading Estate, Fonthill Road, London N4 3HN. Email emailprotectedWomens Therapy Centre For psychotherapy by women, in the London a rea. Phone 020 7263 6200. Address 10 Manor Gardens, London N7 6JS. Emailemailprotected Website www.womenstherapycentre.co.ukWomans Trust Provides free one-to-one counselling and weekly support groups for women who have been abused. It also offers an advocacy service, currently for abused women in the Westminster, Kensington, Chelsea and Greenwichareas, which is also free of charge. Emergency 24 hour help phone 0774 708 0964. Office phone 020 7 0340 304. AddressLighthouse West London, 111-117 Lancaster Road, London, W11 1QT.

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