Sunday, November 10, 2019

Mixed Schools Is the Optimum

Mixed Schools is the optimum Coeducation or mixed-gender education is the integrated education of male and female students in the same environment, while unisex education is the education where male and female students attend in separate classes or in separate buildings or schools. In the past, mixed schools were not acceptable, but by the time it became popular. Mixed schools are better for students socially, and it also develops their educational skills and psychological things.Parents recommend mixed schools because it develops many skills for the kids. Mixed schools make students get used to the social life. Supporters of the unisex schools believe that the school is not a place for developing your social life skills, but just for studying. Also, some parents do not want their children to be in mixed school because at certain ages, students of the opposite sex can be a distraction. However, the best place that helps children to get ready for the real social life is the school. St udents in single-sex classrooms will one day live and work side-by-side with members of the opposite sex. Educating students in single-sex schools limits their opportunity to work cooperatively and co-exist successfully with members of the opposite sex† (Stanberry, 2009). It's so important to have friends from both sides of the fence. â€Å"You would never find a workplace with only females, so this prepares you for the outside world much better† (Davidson, 2003).According to the Education International, statistics indicated that mixed schools students have recorded the highest success rate. People who believe that unisex schools are the best say that mixed schools distract students’ attention. On the other hand, the researchers conducted extensive interviews with individual students and found excellent students do not get distracted. In the 1960s and 70s, Dale reported (1969, 1971, 1974) that boys, girls and teachers were happier in co-educational secondary scho ols, and boys did better academically within them. Professor Analia Schlosser, an economist from the Eitan Berglas School of Economics at Tel Aviv, found that elementary school, co-ed classrooms with a majority of female students showed increased academic performance for both boys and girls† (Schlosser, 2006). In high school, the classrooms with the best academic achievement were consistently those that had a higher percentage of girls. Moreover, mixed schools will provide creative environment because both genders think differently so that they could share information and get more experience to come up with better results. We often hear of things like boys and girls learn differently, but the biology of learning is exactly the same† (Halpern, 2002) On the psychological side, students in the mixed schools feel as they were one family. Some parents who support the unisex schools think that their children get affected psychologically because they get shy from the opposite s ex. However, children must get used to deal with the opposite sex to get more social skills and feel comfortable when dealing with the opposite sex.Males and females who do not regularly interact with each other are likely to entertain stereotypical beliefs about the other sex. To sum up, boys studying in mixed schools become kind and not aggressive because they deal with the soft gender. Both genders also become in a good psychological conditions. Students also feel free in mixed schools because they feel as they were in their home. Mixed schools provide better environment and atmosphere for the students. Students studying in mixed schools get common with members of the opposite sex.Also, these schools provide the students with an environment that helps them to share ideas and become experienced. Dealing with the opposite sex makes you feel free because you deal with each other as relatives. Works Cited Davidson, M. (2003). Single-sex and mixed schools. Ms Davidson. Halpern, D. (20 02). Diane Halpern. Schlosser, A. (2006). Mixed schools. Analia Schlosser. Stanberry, K. (2009). Single-sex education. Kristin Stanberry. Dale, A. and Egerton, M. with Joshi, H. and Davies, H. (1997) Highly Educated Women: Evidence from the national child development study, DfEE (HMSO, London). Mixed Schools Is the Optimum Mixed Schools is the optimum Coeducation or mixed-gender education is the integrated education of male and female students in the same environment, while unisex education is the education where male and female students attend in separate classes or in separate buildings or schools. In the past, mixed schools were not acceptable, but by the time it became popular. Mixed schools are better for students socially, and it also develops their educational skills and psychological things.Parents recommend mixed schools because it develops many skills for the kids. Mixed schools make students get used to the social life. Supporters of the unisex schools believe that the school is not a place for developing your social life skills, but just for studying. Also, some parents do not want their children to be in mixed school because at certain ages, students of the opposite sex can be a distraction. However, the best place that helps children to get ready for the real social life is the school. St udents in single-sex classrooms will one day live and work side-by-side with members of the opposite sex. Educating students in single-sex schools limits their opportunity to work cooperatively and co-exist successfully with members of the opposite sex† (Stanberry, 2009). It's so important to have friends from both sides of the fence. â€Å"You would never find a workplace with only females, so this prepares you for the outside world much better† (Davidson, 2003).According to the Education International, statistics indicated that mixed schools students have recorded the highest success rate. People who believe that unisex schools are the best say that mixed schools distract students’ attention. On the other hand, the researchers conducted extensive interviews with individual students and found excellent students do not get distracted. In the 1960s and 70s, Dale reported (1969, 1971, 1974) that boys, girls and teachers were happier in co-educational secondary scho ols, and boys did better academically within them. Professor Analia Schlosser, an economist from the Eitan Berglas School of Economics at Tel Aviv, found that elementary school, co-ed classrooms with a majority of female students showed increased academic performance for both boys and girls† (Schlosser, 2006). In high school, the classrooms with the best academic achievement were consistently those that had a higher percentage of girls. Moreover, mixed schools will provide creative environment because both genders think differently so that they could share information and get more experience to come up with better results. We often hear of things like boys and girls learn differently, but the biology of learning is exactly the same† (Halpern, 2002) On the psychological side, students in the mixed schools feel as they were one family. Some parents who support the unisex schools think that their children get affected psychologically because they get shy from the opposite s ex. However, children must get used to deal with the opposite sex to get more social skills and feel comfortable when dealing with the opposite sex.Males and females who do not regularly interact with each other are likely to entertain stereotypical beliefs about the other sex. To sum up, boys studying in mixed schools become kind and not aggressive because they deal with the soft gender. Both genders also become in a good psychological conditions. Students also feel free in mixed schools because they feel as they were in their home. Mixed schools provide better environment and atmosphere for the students. Students studying in mixed schools get common with members of the opposite sex.Also, these schools provide the students with an environment that helps them to share ideas and become experienced. Dealing with the opposite sex makes you feel free because you deal with each other as relatives. Works Cited Davidson, M. (2003). Single-sex and mixed schools. Ms Davidson. Halpern, D. (20 02). Diane Halpern. Schlosser, A. (2006). Mixed schools. Analia Schlosser. Stanberry, K. (2009). Single-sex education. Kristin Stanberry. Dale, A. and Egerton, M. with Joshi, H. and Davies, H. (1997) Highly Educated Women: Evidence from the national child development study, DfEE (HMSO, London).

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